RV Experience Sharing our experience about RVing

November 30, 1999

Driving With A Toad

Filed under: Uncategorized — donwood49 @ 12:00 am

When you park towing a car, pull to the end of the parking area so that no one can block your exit or cause you to need to back up.

When parking parallel b the curb, be careful of the tilt of the vehicle whic might cause you to hit street signs or other objects.

Install and use a tire pressure monitor syatem.

Before each departure, even for short stops, do a walk-around. Check the towbar. Are all pins and cables as they should be? Check all the tire.

Do a test of the tracking of your toad. Start a turn. Mark the position of your rear tire as you makeĀ  the turn. Use rocks or cones. Check the position of the toads wheels as it completes the turn. Does it track with the tow vehicles rear tires or does it pass inside, closer to the roads edge?

Check your lights.

Install a braking system and use it. Check its operation regularly.

Never backup when flat towing your car. Except for short distances to tighten the turn. Watch out not to turn too much and jackknife. You should secure the steering wheel to hold the tires in the current position. The tires will tend to not track correctly when backing and could damage the front end alighment ofr worse.

If have backed up several hundred feet on a sandy dirt road. The loose road surface allowed the tires to slide more easily and securing the steering wheel kept the tires close to the proper alignment since i didn’t turn when backing.

I’ve secured the steering wheel in several ways. Use another person to hold the steering wheel in the toad. Use the seat belt or a rope to secure it. or just remove the key and lock the steering wheel. The later method might lead to shearing the lock pin so be careful.

When we hook up we have to turn off the air conditioning compressor, the lights, the radio etc. We unlock the steering wheel and occasionally it ends up in the accessory position.

Make a checklist of what needs to be done and checked when hooking up and disconnecting.

We keep a hammer available in the toad to use to quickly knock the pins out to disconnect the towbar if needed when we get trapped. If the tow bar isn’t relaxed the pins can be real difficult to get out.

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